Ten Uses for Body Balm

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Lavender Tea Tree Body Balms group of four

We’ve received many compliments on our body balms, but some might be wondering just what a balm is. Other common names are “salve” or “cream” depending on who you ask. Essentially, a balm is a waterless cream designed to soothe, heal, and/or protect in some way. Because they don’t contain water, little to no preservation is required. We help the oils retain their potency with the help of Vitamin E and rosemary resin. We are very proud of our balms, which do all three and serve multiple functions. We’d like to list some of them below:

1) Facial moisturizer

– Our balm is non-comedogenic and can be applied directly to the face as a spot treatment for dryness before makeup, or at night before bed. A little goes a long way. Balms are particularly good for individuals with normal to dry skin.

2) Hair and scalp conditioner

– For those with dry, flyaway hair, the balm helps to coat the hair shaft. Ingredients like shea butter, olive and sweet almond oils quickly add moisture and shine. A little can be massaged into the scalp to soothe itching and irritation. Again, a little goes a long way.

3) Bug repellent

– A number of essential oils like lavender, tea tree and eucalyptus are effective bug repellents. Peppermint and neem oils are also effective against pests. We use only pure essential oils, not fragrance oils, in our balms. Fragrance oils do not contain the same botanical properties as essential oils.

4) Lip gloss

– Why buy a separate product when a balm will do just as well? Use it alone over your favorite lipstick for a little shine. It also soften and protects lips with candelilla wax and castor oil.

5) Cuticle cream

– Soften and protect dry nails and cuticles throughout the day. At bedtime, you can enhance the softening effect by smoothing balm on dry hands and donning cotton gloves. In the morning, your skin will be super-soft!

6) Barrier balm

– Smooth on one of our balms on your hands before washing dishes or working in the garden to protect skin and nails from harsh chemicals and other irritants. Excess water can cause nails to thin, while detergent cleaners can leave skin dry. Balms are a quick solution that repel water for optimal protection.

7) Natural lubricant

– Instead of synthetic-based products, you can try an all-natural and sustainable alternative to help relieve chafing, diaper rash, cradle cap and other skin conditions. Re-apply as needed.

8) Skin Salve

– Use a little balm to soothe insect bites, razor burn, athlete’s foot and other skin irritations. Our Ache-Relief Balm can help reduce redness and inflammation. Apply 3-4 times and as needed for immediate relief.

9) Bear balm/hair groom

– Our balm is fine for the guys as well. Use to condition hair and soften an itchy beard. It’s great for protecting skin after shaving.

10) Wood/shoe/bag conditioner

– Yes, our balms work on wood, shoes and bags! Just rub a little onto the item with a soft cloth. It leaves a protective shine and conditions without the need for toxic sprays or expensive finishers and petroleum or animal-based waxes.

Perhaps you will think of other uses for our balms. If you do, please let us know.

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Bar soap vs Liquid soap

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hand washing with bar soap

Bar soap vs liquid soap – the debate rages

Have you ever asked yourself about bar soap vs liquid soap for your regular skincare routine? There are many cleansers on the market today, and it can often be confusing to figure out which product is best for you and your family.

There are a few things to consider, like 1) cost, 2) effectiveness, 3) earth friendliness, and 4) additives. Which is easier to use? Which is kinder to skin? Which ones provide the most skin benefits? The choices may seem endless.

It’s important to know what soap is. “Real” soap is made by combining a fat with an alkali. IN the beginning, soaps were created by using rendered animal fat and wood ash. The basic formula hasn’t changed very much. What has changed are the ingredients used to make today’s soaps. Commercial soap manufacturers use fats derived from rendered cows or pigs to make their soaps. Manufacturers like WEBA would rather not support the factory farms that produce most of the animal fat used today. Instead, we use organic plant oils and butters, which contain many skin-nourishing fatty acids.

Companies also make non-soap cleansers which consist of commercially manufactured surfactants, like Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, which can be derived using petrolatum, a non-renewable resource. They are high foaming and they clean well, which can sometimes result in skin irritation. It is particularly harsh on hair, especially color-treated hair. There are alternatives to this ingredient which area less harsh available on the market today. You can read more about sulfates by visiting Best Health Magazine’s The truth about sulfates webpage.

Liquid soap, ounce for ounce, is more expensive than bar soap. The primary ingredient in liquid soaps and gels is water. This makes it more wasteful, as it’s hard to measure how much you’re using. This also makes it more likely to grow bacteria and mold. Hence, companies must add preservatives to liquid soaps. They often add other additives, as well, like artificial fragrance and coloring. Some of these ingredients may cause irritation or allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Bar soap does not require a preservative; its high pH provides protection against bacterial growth. However, bar soap manufacturers can use additives, too, so it’s important to read labels to avoid potential allergens or harsh chemicals.

If the jury’s still out on which soap is better, why not give our bar soaps a try? They are plant-based, synthetic and SLS free, and use pure aromatherapy essential oils for a fresh natural scent that is naturally antiseptic. You can see our selection by visiting our bar soaps store page.

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