Clean Beauty Is Here To Stay

Clean beauty is here to stay blog post image

Have you head the term “clean beauty?” Most product-savvy consumers have. It’s the latest catchword in the personal care arsenal, alongside words like “natural” “organic” and “sustainable”, and it’s here to stay. It describes products made without certain potentially irritating or harmful ingredients. So what does “clean beauty” mean?

Why Clean Beauty?

Ever since the Environmental Working Group published the “Toxic Twenty” ingredients in cosmetics, consumers have been more curious about ingredients found in personal care products. Increasingly, consumers are reading product labels to screen out personal care products that may contain potential irritants or harmful ingredients. In the U.S., the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for regulating cosmetics, but they do not approve them before they go to market. When cosmetics are used for therapeutic purposes they are classified as drugs, which require FDA approval. For more specifics on this, visit the FDA authority webpage.

One of the major issues to come up of late has to do with prohibited ingredients. The FDA currently prohibits 11 potentially toxic ingredients for use in cosmetics. You can view the list here. In Canada and Europe, however, the list of banned ingredients is much higher. If the FDA does not have to approve, or even recall, cosmetic products, what can we do as consumers to make educated purchasing decisions?

What Are Clean Beauty Products?

According to an article in Good Housekeeping, clean beauty products are formulated without potentially harmful ingredients, whether synthetic or natural. Beauty retailer Sephora has created its “Clean At Sephora” line of products made without 1) sulfates, 2) parabens, 3) formaldehyde, 4) phthalates, or 5) mineral oil, among others. A number of beauty brands have created their own lists of banned ingredients. Even Target has joined the bandwagon with their own “Clean Beauty” label. Their list also includes oxybenzone, BHA , BHT, aluminum and artificial sweeteners. Read more about this initiative here. It’s important to remember, though, that this label category is not a legal definition. The term is not regulated by the FDA. But it’s a step in the right direction.

Given the growing number of clean beauty options, it’s easier than ever for consumers to be able to choose products that meet their needs. If you’re like me and you have sensitive skin, as well, it’s important to avoid known toxins and other irritants. At WEBA Natural Products, we have created products that are free of the above-mentioned ingredients since from the beginning. In fact, we were “clean” before it became fashionable. You can check out our current lineup of clean products on our Shop page.